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Every adult in Petaluma did not get a delivery of cannabis last week. It only seemed that way to Dave Tohill, a kind of mobile “budtender” for Mercy Wellness, the Cotati-based dispensary. In a single day, Tohill had 40-plus deliveries in Petaluma alone.

One of his customers was a woman who’d spent the morning working in her yard, just off Maria Drive.

“I’ve driven past your house three times today,” said Tohill, as he delivered her package. “I like what you’ve done with the pavers.”

– Read the entire article at The Press Democrat.

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Zachary McCreedy was looking for an innovative product to create. Something small, simple and reasonably priced, he says, that people use every day.

The 26-year-old entrepreneur from Norfolk, Virginia half jokes that he first thought about creating a new kind of spoon. “Spoons are used by people all over the world billions of times a day,” says McCreedy. “Imagine the glory of inventing a better spoon. Nobel prize worthy if you ask me.”

Five years ago, McCreedy decided to take a hiatus from college to give more attention to a website he’d created about table tennis. People were loving the 20 or so informative articles he had featured on his site and he was pulling down a few hundred dollars a month of passive income.

– Read the entire article at Forbes.

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CANNABIS CULTURE – The first event to take a hit was the Stepping High Festival, slated for March 20-21st in Negril, on Jamaica’s west coast.

It’s the longest running ganja festival in Jamaica and a staple on the event circuit. Ready to make it’s 17th appearance, organiser, Karlene Connell, stated in a release that the event was suspended indefinitely. This seems to the state of affairs with events and cannabis tourism not being exempt. 

This was the first in what may be a litany of event cancellations and vacation halts for the 2020 tourist season. The high-season runs from January to March and tourism is Jamaica’s largest income earner. With the amendment to the Dangerous Drugs Act, in 2015, cannabis is not fully legal in Jamaica, but one can carry up to 2 ounces and licensed dispensaries can sell cannabis products. Tourists and visitors are required to have a statement from a medical doctor or medical cannabis card to get access to medicinal marijuana products from legal dispensaries and herb-houses. 

Some local dispensaries also accept State issued medical marijuana cards from the United States. The Corona Virus may have started to spread at the outset of the early months

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The enactment of the 2018 Farm Bill and the legalization of hemp and hemp derivatives, including cannabidiol (“CBD”), has led to a massive CBD craze in the United States. The highly coveted cannabinoid is infused with everything: bath bombs, dog treats and even workout clothes (yes, workout clothes!). According to a recent study by Cowen, the sales of these products are expected to reach $16 billion by 2025.

Thanks to globalization, this sudden boom is not contained within the U.S. borders. Europe has also experienced a huge uptick in the sales of these products, which are expected to reach nearly $1.7 billion by 2023.

In light of this global expansion and the desire of many of our clients to export their hemp and hemp-derived CBD (“Hemp CBD”) products to Europe, we are presenting a mini-series that briefly analyzes how certain European countries treat hemp and the sale and marketing of hemp-derived CBD. In the second post of these series, we now turn our attention to Spain, whose legal framework is closely intertwined with that of the European Union (EU). (Our first post, on Great Britain, can be found here.)

Spain has a long history of hemp production. It is said that the sails of

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Canadian officials are turning to the cannabis industry to see if laboratories typically used to check for cannabinoids can be also used to test for COVID-19.

In an email sent to licensed cannabis industry executives on Thursday obtained by BNN Bloomberg, Health Canada acting director general Joanne Garrah asked respondents if there was any spare lab capacity to assist the country with COVID-19 testing.

“Health Canada is working to identify lab capacity that might be available across the country in various sectors, including at licensed cannabis production sites, to assist with supporting COVID-19 testing,” the email stated.

– Read the entire article at BNN Bloomberg.

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Labs have been taking protective steps like staggering workers’ shifts and implementing additional sanitation measures.

Despite layoffs and downsizing in the cannabis industry over recent months, U.S. cannabis testing labs are still doing a brisk business, even in the midst of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Staff at some labs have voiced concerns over a potential lack of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as masks, gloves and goggles, as well as sanitization supplies. But there is another issue. Should any such labs be forced to close as a result of the outbreak, many states could experience serious delays and other issues with their cannabis supply.

– Read the entire article at The London Free Press.

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CANNABIS CULTURE – The biggest event of the 21st century, the COVID-19 outbreak, has dominated human behavior and mindshare.

For the first time in my life and for most people reading this, the whole world is focused on solving one problem.order to stop the spread and help treat those that are infected, we need medical professionals, volunteers and supplies.

Already, a number of cannabis companies have stepped up to help.

Canopy Growth Corporation, the 800lb gorilla of the industry, recently donated “thousands” of gloves, Tyvek suits, and masks sourced from two massive greenhouses in British Columbia.

While small and mid-sized cannabis ventures lack the budget of Canopy, they can still make a difference.

At Crazy Calm, a CBD coffee startup, we initially thought about contacting the retailers that carry us. That’s the bulk of our sales.

But as you’ve probably seen, and for good reason, movement is a bit restricted right now. Many retailers that carry us are closed and limited. But our e-commerce platform is unaffected.

Per our announcement on our blog that we published this week:

For every online order from now until the end of March, all profits will be donated to Direct Relief.

We chose Direct

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The continuing pandemic of the COVID-19 coronavirus has sparked panic buying in countries around the globe, leading to shortages of toilet paper, cleaning supplies, and some grocery items. Cannabis retailers have also seen a spike in sales, with long lines of customers eager to stock up on their favorite flower, concentrates, and edibles in several cities.

But what exactly is driving the binge buying? Anxiety? Fears of a potential supply shortage? To find out, online medicinal cannabis resource AmericanMarijuana.org asked nearly 1,000 pot users about their current buying habits. Participants were asked questions ranging from how they felt about the outbreak to how important cannabis is compared to other consumer goods in short supply because of the pandemic.

To conduct the poll, researchers surveyed 990 U.S. marijuana users. A qualifying question was used to ensure those being surveyed actually use cannabis before the survey asked respondents their views on several issues surrounding the coronavirus pandemic and cannabis.

Just under half of the survey’s participants said that they had indeed stocked up on cannabis products because of the COVID-19 outbreak. Among those who said that they had stocked up, 55% said that they did so to calm themselves during the coronavirus

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CANNABIS CULTURE – On March 4, 2020, three Mexican Senate Committees approved in a joint session, generally, the cannabis bill – last version circulated on February 28, 2020 (the “Bill”). The Committees’ approval places such Bill on its way to Senate’s general vote.During the meeting, specific reservations were brought by Senators who voted in favor of the bill. Such reservations (i.e. exceptions for potential minor changes) relate to recreational user rights, obstacles for the emergence of the hemp industry, and barriers for market entry affecting farmer communities, among other subjects. The controversial provisions that poise obstacles for the hemp industry from the absence of a clear distinction between cannabis and hemp regulation, which may deter the birth and development of such industry.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, assuming the Bill’s legislative process is successful and eventually concludes with the publication of the new law, the agency tasked with regulating the market and issuing available licenses (Instituto Mexicano del Cannabis, or Mexican Cannabis Institute) is set to be operating allegedly by January of 2021.

It is important to highlight that restrictive provisions, such as the 49% limit on foreign investment and the ban on vertical integration, still remain in the Bill. All in

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