Michigan Marijuana News

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On Friday, Governor Rick Snyder made public the first round of members appointed to the Marihuana Advisory Panel — a requirement of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act implemented in December of last year.

The 17-member Marihuana Advisory Panel will consist of experts from a wide variety of fields who will suggest best practices for actualizing the various facets of the Licensing Act to both the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board and the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.

“These individuals come from a range of backgrounds and I am confident their combined experiences will allow them to positively contribute to this panel,” Gov. Snyder said.

Each appointed member of the panel will hold their seat for three years retroactive to the Act’s official start date, ending on Dec. 20, 2019.

The initial appointees include:

Local police representative: James Berlin, chief of the Roseville Police Department County representative: Alan Helmkamp, director of commission affairs for Wayne County Township representative: Catherine Kaufman, partner at Bauckham, Sparks, Thall, Seeber, & Kaufman, P.C. Michigan Sheriffs’ Association representative: Kim Cole, sheriff of Mason County Licensed physicians representative: Saqib Nakadar, medical director of Doc Greens Clinic Medical marijuana patients representative: Paul Samways, planning director for Cannabis Accounting and national director of the Bridge West Network Cities and villages representative: Suzanne Schulz, planning director and managing director of design, development, and community engagement for city of Grand Rapids

Next, Gov. Snyder will appoint representatives from the following fields:

Michigan State Police Michigan Department of Health and Human Services Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs Attorney General’s office Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development

After licensing begins, the remaining seats will be filled with experts in transportation, safety compliance, dispensaries, cultivation, and processing.

Image courtesy of Allie Beckett

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Michigan officials are gearing up for a mad rush on Dec. 15, the first day cannabis business-license applications become available in the state. The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs will be releasing applications for all five categories of the state’s medical cannabis industry, including cultivation, processing, testing, transportation, and sales.

Nearly a thousand would-be business operators have signed up for state-run training sessions, Shelly Edgerton, director of the state’s licensing department, told a crowd in Ann Arbor, according to the Detroit Free Press. “We may have 50. We may have 1,500. We may have 5,000,” she said.

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Attendees of the Ann Arbor training session had a host of questions about application details, the Free Press reported, ranging from licensing-related costs to how the state will accept tax payments. Offices in other states have been overwhelmed as cannabis operators, largely unable to get comprehensive banking services, deliver thousands of dollars in cash.

Dispensaries have been operating in a kind of gray area in Michigan for several years. Medical marijuana became legal in 2008, but no statewide licensing program existed at the time.

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The shift to a state-regulated industry could cause some hiccups. Some lawmakers have called for dispensaries to shut down on Dec. 15, reopening only once they receive a state licenses. Others worry that could interrupt access to medicine for cannabis patients. State lawmakers in both the House and Senate have introduced bills that would allow dispensaries to stay open during the transition period.

The state was home to 218,556 registered patients as of late 2016, according to the most recent available state data.

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Michigan regulators are bracing themselves for a flood of applications from entrepreneurs hoping to become a part of the state’s fledgling medical cannabis industry. The state licensing department will begin offering applications to dispensaries, cultivation facilities, processors, testing facilities, and transportation services as of December 15th. The Michigan Medical Licensing Board expects to begin granting these licenses to the winning applicants early next year.

Shelley Edgerton, director of the state’s Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, recently spoke at a public meeting to answer questions posed by individuals interested in getting involved in the lucrative new industry. “We may have 50 [applications]. We may have 1,500. We may have 5,000,” she told the audience, according to Detroit Free Press. “But we’ve had close to 1,000 people who have signed up for our training. So we envision a large number of applicants on the first day.”

One of the most pressing concerns addressed at the meeting was the fate of the state’s current medical cannabis dispensaries, which will be forced to close until the state grants them their new licenses. Under Michigan’s original medical marijuana law, patients were only allowed to source their cannabis products from licensed caregivers, who could provide cannabis to five patients each.

To address the difficulty in finding local caregivers, numerous medical cannabis dispensaries opened across the state, illegally selling medical cannabis to those in need. Last year, the state completely revamped their medical cannabis regulations in order to allow dispensaries to legally sell cannabis, but have demanded that these existing dispensaries shut down until the new license system has been worked out.

For many of the state’s 200,000-plus registered medical marijuana users, the prospect of being cut off from their medicine for an unspecified period of time is a frightening one. In response, bills have been introduced

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Northern Michigan University is offering a unique and unusual degree programme in Marijuana. According to Detroit Free Press, the university started its medical plant chemistry program with a dozen students this semester. The program is a combination of other subjects as well like chemistry, biology, botany, horticulture, marketing and finance. The university is offering a four-year degree course addressing the science and business behind growing marijuana. The university is offering a course for the cultivation and properties of the marijuana herb. There are other universities that offer classes on marijuana policy and law such as Oaksterdam University, Cannabis College, and Humboldt Cannabis College, all in California; and THC University, the Grow School and Clover Leaf University in Denver. These universities offer a variety of disciplines centered on marijuana.

Brandon Canfield, an associate chemistry professor at Northern Michigan said that the program does not require students growing marijuana plant but instead forage and discover other plants that are traditionally recognized with medicinal values similar to marijuana but are not illegal to grow. Students learn to measure and extract compounds from other plants and then utilize that knowledge to marijuana which is used in treatment of various illnesses like chronic pain, nausea, seizures and glaucoma.

Alex Roth, a sophomore in the program said, “When they hear what my major is, there are a lot of people who say, ‘Wow, cool dude. You’re going to get degree growing marijuana, but it’s not an easy degree at all.”’ Brandon Canfield said that he got the idea for the program last year when he was attending the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting in San Diego. Reportedly he said, “It was my off day and I saw there was a cannabis chemistry group that was putting on a whole series of talks. I heard all about

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image via Michigan Public Radio

Gov. Rick Snyder announced initial appointments to the Marihuana Advisory Panel established by the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act.

Housed within the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, the 17-member Panel was created to make recommendations to the Department and to the Medical Marihuana Licensing Board concerning the administration, implementation, and enforcement of the Medical Marihuana Facilities Licensing Act and the Marihuana Tracking Act.

“These individuals come from a range of backgrounds and I am confident their combined experiences will allow them to positively contribute to this panel,” Snyder said.

James Berlin of Warren is chief of the Roseville Police Department where he has served in various positions since graduating from the Macomb Police Academy in 1982. He will represent local police.

Kimberly (Kim) Cole of Ludington is currently serving his second term as the sheriff of Mason County. He has more than 30 years of law enforcement experience and holds an associate’s degree in criminal justice from West Shore Community College. He will represent sheriffs.

Alan Helmkamp of Livonia is the director of commission affairs for Wayne County. He was previously an assistant county executive and served as an attorney in private practice. Helmkamp holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and pre-law from the University of Michigan and a law degree from Wayne State University Law School. He will represent counties.

Catherine Kaufman of South Haven is a partner at the municipal law firm of Bauckham, Sparks, Thall, Seeber & Kaufman, P.C.  Kaufman holds a bachelor’s degree in urban policy from James Madison College, a master’s degree in urban planning from the University of Michigan, and a law degree from Wayne State University Law School. She will represent townships.

Saqib Nakadar is the medical director of Doc Greens Clinic, focusing on internal medicine

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Published: Oct 16, 2017, 3:06 pm • Updated: Oct 16, 2017, 3:06 pm

MARQUETTE, Mich. — A university in Michigan is offering an unusual degree — in marijuana.

Northern Michigan University in Marquette began its medical plant chemistry program this semester, with about a dozen students in the first class, the Detroit Free Press reported. The program combines chemistry, biology, botany, horticulture, marketing and finance.

It’s an unusual program. Other universities offer classes on marijuana policy and law. And places such as Oaksterdam University, Cannabis College, and Humboldt Cannabis College, all in California; and THC University, the Grow School and Clover Leaf University in Denver offer certificates in a variety of disciplines. But Northern Michigan’s program is unique because the university is offering a four-year degree addressing the science and business behind growing marijuana.

“When they hear what my major is, there are a lot of people who say, ‘Wow, cool dude. You’re going to get a degree growing marijuana,’” said Alex Roth, a sophomore in the program. “But it’s not an easy degree at all.”

Brandon Canfield, an associate chemistry professor at Northern Michigan, said students don’t grow marijuana plants in the program, but instead look to other plants that are traditionally recognized with medicinal value but aren’t illegal to grow. Students learn how to measure and extract the compounds in the plants that can be used for medicinal purposes, then transfer that knowledge to marijuana, which has been used to treat a variety of illnesses, including chronic pain, nausea, seizures and glaucoma.

Canfield said he got the idea while attending the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting in San Diego last year.

“It was my off day and I saw there was a cannabis chemistry group that was putting on a whole series

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Local officials are beginning to decide if they want medical marijuana businesses in their communities before the state starts giving out licenses next year. Wochit

Medical marijuana advocates gathered in Ann Arbor Sunday to learn about the regulations and taxes the business will face next year.

A medical marijuana plant(Photo: Anthony Souffle, Chicago Tribune)

Officials are expecting a rush  Dec. 15 when Michigan begins offering applications to people who want to start a medical marijuana business and be part of what is expected to be a $700-million-a-year industry in the state.

“We may have 50. We may have 1,500. We may have 5,000,” Shelly Edgerton, director of the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs, told an audience of nearly 200 people who showed up at an Ann Arbor hotel on a rainy Sunday afternoon to learn about getting into the lucrative medical marijuana business.

“But we’ve had close to 1,000 people who have signed up for our  training. So we envision a large number of applicants on the first day.” 

The license applications for five categories of medical cannabis licenses — growers, processors, testers, transporters and dispensaries — will become available on Dec. 15 and the Michigan Medical Licensing Board is expected to begin awarding licenses in the first quarter of next year.

People attending the session wanted to know everything from how much it will cost them to get approval from local and state authorities for the license, to how the state will accept tax payments from an industry that has so far been shunned from traditional banks because marijuana still is considered an illegal drug by the federal government.

The answers from Edgerton, lawmakers and lobbyists for the medical

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MARQUETTE, Mich. (AP) — A university in Michigan is offering an unusual degree — in marijuana.

Northern Michigan University in Marquette began its medical plant chemistry program this semester, with about a dozen students in the first class, the Detroit Free Press reported. The program combines chemistry, biology, botany, horticulture, marketing and finance.

It’s an unusual program. Other universities offer classes on marijuana policy and law. And places such as Oaksterdam University, Cannabis College, and Humboldt Cannabis College, all in California; and THC University, the Grow School and Clover Leaf University in Denver offer certificates in a variety of disciplines. But Northern Michigan’s program is unique because the university is offering a four-year degree addressing the science and business behind growing marijuana.

“When they hear what my major is, there are a lot of people who say, ‘Wow, cool dude. You’re going to get a degree growing marijuana,’” said Alex Roth, a sophomore in the program. “But it’s not an easy degree at all.”

Brandon Canfield, an associate chemistry professor at Northern Michigan, said students don’t grow marijuana plants in the program, but instead look to other plants that are traditionally recognized with medicinal value but aren’t illegal to grow. Students learn how to measure and extract the compounds in the plants that can be used for medicinal purposes, then transfer that knowledge to marijuana, which has been used to treat a variety of illnesses, including chronic pain, nausea, seizures and glaucoma.

Canfield said he got the idea while attending the American Chemical Society’s annual meeting in San Diego last year.

“It was my off day and I saw there was a cannabis chemistry group that was putting on a whole series of talks,” he said. “I heard all about the need for analytical chemists and all sorts of interesting talks.

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HIGHLAND PARK, Mich. (WXYZ) – Police rushed in right after the lunch rush to bust what they say was a marijuana selling operation inside a Subway restaurant in Highland Park, Michigan. 

Police Chief Chester Logan said they got a tip a week ago, confirmed the case undercover and arrested two men in the Friday bust. 

The owner of the store said the ones busted were a manager who worked there for 12 years and a clerk. 

Police used a tracking dog and found a small amount of pot inside the manager’s car outside. The dog also found a big stash inside. 

The restaurant was closed after the arrests but the owner is moving staff from a different store and cleaning up to reopen as soon as possible. 

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The Centreville Village Council has set a public hearing on a proposed medical marijuana ordinance for 5 p.m. Monday at the village office.

Elena Meadows

The Centreville Village Council has set a public hearing on a proposed medical marijuana ordinance for 5 p.m. Monday at the village office. The ordinance would allow medical marijuana growers, processors, secure transporters and safety compliance facilities in areas zoned I-1 (industrial district), and provisioning centers in areas zoned C-1 (local commercial district). They must meet requirements including managing odor and noise so it is confined to the facility itself, having a security plan for preventing unauthorized access to or theft from the facility, and maintaining distance from schools, parks and churches in compliance with the Michigan Medical Marijuana Facilities Licensing Act (MMMFLA). The purpose of the ordinance is: n To implement the provisions of the MMMFLA with respect to local zoning and land use. n To establish a new section in the village of Centreville code pertaining to the permitted distribution of medical marijuana consistent with state law; nothing in the ordinance purports to permit activities that are otherwise illegal under state or local law. n To prevent the diversion of medical marijuana for unlawful use and protect the safety and welfare of the community. n To provide for and limit the location, type and number of facilities licensed under the MMMFLA within the village limits, without totally prohibiting the types of land uses otherwise permitted by the MMMFLA.

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