Cannabis

All posts tagged Cannabis

Notice
Important notice for Seattle US Cannabis Cup attendees.A company calling itself High Times Travel LLC (hightimestravel.com) has illegally infringed on the HIGH TIMES trademark to sell travel packages for the upcoming US Cup in Seattle.
This company is not affiliated with HIGH TIMES Magazine in any way. If you have purchased a travel package from High Times Travel LLC please contact HIGH TIMES immediately by emailing us at [email protected]
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The Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Committee (MILegalize) will launch their petition drive to legalize marijuana in Michigan at the Capitol Building in Lansing on Thursday.
June 25 is the official start of the signature collection drive, which aims to place the issue of legalization of the possession and use of marijuana for adults in Michigan on the 2016 general election ballot. Over 253,000 valid signatures are required to do so.
The MILegalize program will allow each adult in Michigan the opportunity to grow up to 12 marijuana plants, it will jump start the hemp industry in the state, protect the current Michigan Medical Marihuana Act and generate revenue to fix roads, support schools and provide an income stream for local communities.
The kickoff begins at 1 pm with a rally on the steps of the Capitol Building. Petition signature collection training will take placeonthegrounds oftheCapitol Building intents, per Steven Sharpe, a MILegalize Director.
“This is the event everyone has been waiting for,” said Jamie Lowell, another Director of MILegalize. “People across the state have been asking: when can I collect signatures? Where do I get the petitions? What’s the proper procedure? This is where we answer all those questions.”
Hundreds are expected to attend the rally, with all corners of the state represented. The rally and training will last several hours.
Source: The Compassion Chronicles

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The Michigan Cannabis Coalition (MCC) today took a major setback in their campaign to legalize recreational marijuana for adults in Michigan. In a surprise move before a large crowd filled with government employees, citizens and media, the Oakland County-based special interest group withdrew their petition from consideration by the Michigan Board of State Canvassers.
The MCC is just one of three groups trying to legalize adult use of marijuana in Michigan via the petition process. The Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Initiative, commonly known as MILegalize, is the frontrunner in that competition and had not yet issued a statement on their opponent’s self-proclaimed step backward.
The Board of State Canvassers must approve any language offered by prospective petitioners. The MILegalize group is nearly prepared to submit their language through the same process.
“A lot of people were there,” said Josey Scoggin, co-founder of the Michigan organization Sons and Daughters United, who attended the Board meeting. Many were “shocked when (the petition) was withdrawn,” she observed.
“I think some people were disappointed,” said Jamie Lowell, Chair of the Michigan chapter of Americans for Safe Access, who noted people leaving after the MCC’s representative made the announcement.
The representative advised the Board that the language would be re-submitted at a later date. The Associated Press calls the MCC “anonymous people” who “had been expected to have the form of its petition approved by the Board” before the abrupt about-face.
The Board did approve a petition drive regarding a prevailing wage in Michigan, and earlier this month approved a fracking ban proposal for signature collection.
The next meeting of the Board of State Canvassers has not been scheduled.
Source: The Compassion Chronicles

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The Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Initiative Committee (MCCLRIC) today released language that may be used in a petition drive to put the legalization of the adult use of marijuana in Michigan on the ballot in 2016.
“Although three groups have announced an intention to offer legalization programs, we are the only one to offer our language to the public and disclose our backers and full Board of Directors,” said Committee chairman Jeffrey Hank, an attorney from Lansing. “This Act protects the patients, and is pro-farmer, shopkeeper and scientist. That should make people recognize the superiority of our proposal over the others being discussed.”
The language is available online for evaluation and download at: www.milegalize.com and is included with this release as a .pdf file.
The language of the MiLegalize proposal is geared toward supporting small business. “Small businesses create the greatest number of jobs,” Hank observed.
MiLegalize offers multiple revenue streams for the state, including capturing monies from industrial hemp production- a facet of the comprehensive plan that is absent in the other proposals Hank mentioned.
Attorney Matthew Abel of Detroit called the MILegalize organization, “The smarter economic policy people.”
As part of the MCCLRIC effort to establish practical policies generated by the voters, the organization is sponsoring several town hall-style meetings. “We want to get public input so we can create the best law possible for the people of Michigan,” said Committee Board member Rick Thompson.
“Public input has already led us to include protections for pediatric medical patients, hemp farmers and others,” explained Board member Jim Powers. “This truly is a coalition of Michigan’s citizen groups.”
The first town hall will be held on April 19 at the Sweet Leaf, 400 S. Dort Highway, Flint, and will feature Board members Abel, Thompson and Cary Justice. The event begins at 2pm.
Media Contact/Requests to Participate:
MILegalize: Jeffrey Hank  PO Box 1358, East Lansing Michigan 48826 1-844-534-2516        [email protected]   on Facebook:www.facebook.com/MCCLRIC
Town Hall: [email protected]  400 S. Dort Highway, Flint   1-810-259-2571
View or download the proposed language by clicking on the link below:
Marihuana Legalization, Regulation and Economic Stimulus Act- Draft for Public Comment (1)
Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Initiative Committee
The Board …Read More

Ann Arbor’s annual celebration of all things cannabis, known as the Hash Bash, returns this Saturday.
Thousands of marijuana advocates from throughout Michigan and beyond are expected to swarm the University of Michigan Diag at noon for a two-hour rally featuring speakers ranging from comedian Tommy Chong to Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero, as well as activist John Sinclair, for whom the original rally was held in 1972.
The annual event, which organizers call a “speak out and smoke down” protest, has a long history in Ann Arbor, now in its 44th year.
The addition of 76-year-old Chong, of “Cheech and Chong” fame, to this year’s lineup is expected to draw a larger crowd than usual.
Serving as the political backdrop for this year’s festivities is the prospect of a 2016 ballot initiative to fully legalize marijuana in Michigan, not just for medical purposes.
Representatives from the newly formed Michigan Comprehensive Cannabis Law Reform Initiative Committee will be discussing their plans at the rally.
The group is planning to launch a petition drive this year to put a legalization proposal before Michigan voters in November 2016 to preserve and expand the state’s medical marijuana law, create a system for taxation and regulation of marijuana for use by people who are 21 and older, and permit hemp farming.
The group argues that could bring thousands of jobs and hundreds of millions of dollars to Michigan, including new tax revenue for roads and schools.
Recent polling suggests roughly half of Michigan voters support the concept of legalization and taxation of marijuana.
“Some may say Michigan is not ready. To that, I say we’ve been ready,” said Nick Zettell, Hash Bash organizer and a member of the ballot initiative committee.
“We have quite an impressive movement going on here right now, and we’re going to really be using Hash Bash to mobilize the attendees and get them to spread the word about the cause and our specific legalization effort.”
Zettell said the Hash Bash, the nation’s s longest-running marijuana legalization rally, has evolved into more of a political rally than a protest.
State Rep. Jeff Irwin, D-Ann Arbor, is planning to speak about legislation he’ll be introducing to legalize marijuana in Michigan. A bill he introduced last session seeking to decriminalize marijuana failed to advance in the Legislature.
Irwin said his new bill incorporates lessons learned from Colorado, which legalized marijuana in 2012.
“I’ve been talking with a wide …Read More

The trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry are nigh endless but we have to commend the leaders and legislators out there fighting the good fight. This week is full of battles to be won (and some have been won already!). Here’s the latest from the front lines of the cannabis movement:

U.S. Updates

CALIFORNIA
When federal prosecutors tried to shut down the oldest medical dispensary, not just in Berkeley, but in the entire state of California, the city of Berkeley decided to fight back. Berkeley Patients Group was founded in 1999 and has long been a model for safe access, even as it grew and gained popularity as well as financial success. In 2012, when U.S. Attorney General Melinda Haag moved to seize all assets and close the dispensary’s doors, the city of Berkeley decided that this aggression would not stand and sued to block the forfeiture, arguing that the city would suffer irreparable harm from the loss of one of the most respected legal cannabis dispensary in the community. And wonder of wonders, the city of Berkeley won! Federal authorities ruled in favor of the city and Berkeley Patients Group won the right to serve the community and its patients. It’s a beautiful day in Berkeley!
In addition to this ruling, California’s medical marijuana law may be been expanding, with the recent introduction of HR 262, to protect medical marijuana assets from civil forfeiture, and Assembly Bill 266, which would serve to regulate the vastly unregulated medical marijuana market in California.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The nation’s capital has been in hot water regarding retail cannabis. First, voters passed the measure to legalize cannabis. Then Congress tried to veto the measure via a sneaky rider in their Omnibus spending bill, which denied the District federal finding for a retail market. President Obama then came back (thanks, Obama!) with another sneaky little rider attached to his 2016 budget, which allowed local funding to be used to implement retail cannabis sales in the District. Now after a threat from the District’s new attorney general, the D.C. Council has abandoned plans for a hearing on taxing and regulating cannabis in the District. Will D.C. ever be able to tax, regulate, and sell retail cannabis as per the will of the voters? Stay tuned next week as …Read More

The trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry are nigh endless but we have to commend the leaders and legislators out there fighting the good fight. This week is full of battles to be won (and some have been won already!). Here’s the latest from the front lines of the cannabis movement:

U.S. Updates

CALIFORNIA
When federal prosecutors tried to shut down the oldest medical dispensary, not just in Berkeley, but in the entire state of California, the city of Berkeley decided to fight back. Berkeley Patients Group was founded in 1999 and has long been a model for safe access, even as it grew and gained popularity as well as financial success. In 2012, when U.S. Attorney General Melinda Haag moved to seize all assets and close the dispensary’s doors, the city of Berkeley decided that this aggression would not stand and sued to block the forfeiture, arguing that the city would suffer irreparable harm from the loss of one of the most respected legal cannabis dispensary in the community. And wonder of wonders, the city of Berkeley won! Federal authorities ruled in favor of the city and Berkeley Patients Group won the right to serve the community and its patients. It’s a beautiful day in Berkeley!
In addition to this ruling, California’s medical marijuana law may be been expanding, with the recent introduction of HR 262, to protect medical marijuana assets from civil forfeiture, and Assembly Bill 266, which would serve to regulate the vastly unregulated medical marijuana market in California.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The nation’s capital has been in hot water regarding retail cannabis. First, voters passed the measure to legalize cannabis. Then Congress tried to veto the measure via a sneaky rider in their Omnibus spending bill, which denied the District federal finding for a retail market. President Obama then came back (thanks, Obama!) with another sneaky little rider attached to his 2016 budget, which allowed local funding to be used to implement retail cannabis sales in the District. Now after a threat from the District’s new attorney general, the D.C. Council has abandoned plans for a hearing on taxing and regulating cannabis in the District. Will D.C. ever be able to tax, regulate, and sell retail cannabis as per the will of the voters? Stay tuned next week as …Read More

The trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry are nigh endless but we have to commend the leaders and legislators out there fighting the good fight. This week is full of battles to be won (and some have been won already!). Here’s the latest from the front lines of the cannabis movement:

U.S. Updates

CALIFORNIA
When federal prosecutors tried to shut down the oldest medical dispensary, not just in Berkeley, but in the entire state of California, the city of Berkeley decided to fight back. Berkeley Patients Group was founded in 1999 and has long been a model for safe access, even as it grew and gained popularity as well as financial success. In 2012, when U.S. Attorney General Melinda Haag moved to seize all assets and close the dispensary’s doors, the city of Berkeley decided that this aggression would not stand and sued to block the forfeiture, arguing that the city would suffer irreparable harm from the loss of one of the most respected legal cannabis dispensary in the community. And wonder of wonders, the city of Berkeley won! Federal authorities ruled in favor of the city and Berkeley Patients Group won the right to serve the community and its patients. It’s a beautiful day in Berkeley!
In addition to this ruling, California’s medical marijuana law may be been expanding, with the recent introduction of HR 262, to protect medical marijuana assets from civil forfeiture, and Assembly Bill 266, which would serve to regulate the vastly unregulated medical marijuana market in California.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The nation’s capital has been in hot water regarding retail cannabis. First, voters passed the measure to legalize cannabis. Then Congress tried to veto the measure via a sneaky rider in their Omnibus spending bill, which denied the District federal finding for a retail market. President Obama then came back (thanks, Obama!) with another sneaky little rider attached to his 2016 budget, which allowed local funding to be used to implement retail cannabis sales in the District. Now after a threat from the District’s new attorney general, the D.C. Council has abandoned plans for a hearing on taxing and regulating cannabis in the District. Will D.C. ever be able to tax, regulate, and sell retail cannabis as per the will of the voters? Stay tuned next week as …Read More

The trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry are nigh endless but we have to commend the leaders and legislators out there fighting the good fight. This week is full of battles to be won (and some have been won already!). Here’s the latest from the front lines of the cannabis movement:

U.S. Updates

CALIFORNIA
When federal prosecutors tried to shut down the oldest medical dispensary, not just in Berkeley, but in the entire state of California, the city of Berkeley decided to fight back. Berkeley Patients Group was founded in 1999 and has long been a model for safe access, even as it grew and gained popularity as well as financial success. In 2012, when U.S. Attorney General Melinda Haag moved to seize all assets and close the dispensary’s doors, the city of Berkeley decided that this aggression would not stand and sued to block the forfeiture, arguing that the city would suffer irreparable harm from the loss of one of the most respected legal cannabis dispensary in the community. And wonder of wonders, the city of Berkeley won! Federal authorities ruled in favor of the city and Berkeley Patients Group won the right to serve the community and its patients. It’s a beautiful day in Berkeley!
In addition to this ruling, California’s medical marijuana law may be been expanding, with the recent introduction of HR 262, to protect medical marijuana assets from civil forfeiture, and Assembly Bill 266, which would serve to regulate the vastly unregulated medical marijuana market in California.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The nation’s capital has been in hot water regarding retail cannabis. First, voters passed the measure to legalize cannabis. Then Congress tried to veto the measure via a sneaky rider in their Omnibus spending bill, which denied the District federal finding for a retail market. President Obama then came back (thanks, Obama!) with another sneaky little rider attached to his 2016 budget, which allowed local funding to be used to implement retail cannabis sales in the District. Now after a threat from the District’s new attorney general, the D.C. Council has abandoned plans for a hearing on taxing and regulating cannabis in the District. Will D.C. ever be able to tax, regulate, and sell retail cannabis as per the will of the voters? Stay tuned next week as …Read More

The trials and tribulations of the cannabis industry are nigh endless but we have to commend the leaders and legislators out there fighting the good fight. This week is full of battles to be won (and some have been won already!). Here’s the latest from the front lines of the cannabis movement:

U.S. Updates

CALIFORNIA
When federal prosecutors tried to shut down the oldest medical dispensary, not just in Berkeley, but in the entire state of California, the city of Berkeley decided to fight back. Berkeley Patients Group was founded in 1999 and has long been a model for safe access, even as it grew and gained popularity as well as financial success. In 2012, when U.S. Attorney General Melinda Haag moved to seize all assets and close the dispensary’s doors, the city of Berkeley decided that this aggression would not stand and sued to block the forfeiture, arguing that the city would suffer irreparable harm from the loss of one of the most respected legal cannabis dispensary in the community. And wonder of wonders, the city of Berkeley won! Federal authorities ruled in favor of the city and Berkeley Patients Group won the right to serve the community and its patients. It’s a beautiful day in Berkeley!
In addition to this ruling, California’s medical marijuana law may be been expanding, with the recent introduction of HR 262, to protect medical marijuana assets from civil forfeiture, and Assembly Bill 266, which would serve to regulate the vastly unregulated medical marijuana market in California.

WASHINGTON, D.C.
The nation’s capital has been in hot water regarding retail cannabis. First, voters passed the measure to legalize cannabis. Then Congress tried to veto the measure via a sneaky rider in their Omnibus spending bill, which denied the District federal finding for a retail market. President Obama then came back (thanks, Obama!) with another sneaky little rider attached to his 2016 budget, which allowed local funding to be used to implement retail cannabis sales in the District. Now after a threat from the District’s new attorney general, the D.C. Council has abandoned plans for a hearing on taxing and regulating cannabis in the District. Will D.C. ever be able to tax, regulate, and sell retail cannabis as per the will of the voters? Stay tuned next week as …Read More