Marijuana

All posts tagged Marijuana

Ohio’s Attorney General says marijuana grow operations were found at three of the four places where eight relatives were shot dead in “execution type” killings.

Authorities did not provide further details.

Attorney General Mike DeWine told ABC News earlier that authorities still do not have a suspect description or motive in the Friday killings, saying the suspect or suspects took several steps to cover up their tracks and remove any possible evidence that would help police track them down.

He says authorities have received more than 100 tips so far and they are following up on all of them.

“These were pre-planned, pre-meditated execution-type killings,” DeWine told ABC News today. “Four different homes. A case like this is going to take some time.”

The victims were all members of the Rhoden family, officials said Saturday. They were identified as: Hannah Gilley, 20; Christopher Rhoden, Sr., 40; Christopher Rhoden, Jr., 16; Clarence “Frankie” Rhoden, 20; Dana Rhoden, 37; Gary Rhoden, 38; Hanna Rhoden, 19; and Kenneth Rhoden, 44.

Seven of the victims were found in three homes along the same road in Peebles, a small village about 70 miles east of Cincinnati. The eighth victim was found later than the others in nearby Piketon, officials said.

Some of the victims appeared to have been killed in their sleep and were found shot to death in their beds, DeWine said. One victim, who appeared to be a mother, was killed lying in bed with a 4-day-old baby, he said.

Three young children — the 4-day-old baby, a 6-month-old baby and a 3-year-old — were found unharmed at the various shooting locations, said Pike County Sheriff Charles Reader.

At a news conference this afternoon DeWine described the killings as “a sophisticated operation.”

“They thought this thing through,” DeWine said.

Cincinnati-area businessman Jeff Ruby has offered $25,000 for information that leads to the gunman’s arrest, officials said Saturday.

Investigators also released 911 calls that recorded family members finding their relatives dead inside their homes.

One woman called 911, sounding frantic and out of breath, telling a dispatcher she had found blood throughout her brother-in-law’s house.

“I think my brother-in-law’s dead,” she said. “There’s blood all over the house.”

She then said it looked like someone else was dead there, too, before weeping into the phone.

In another 911 call, a man said: “I just found my cousin with a gunshot wound.”

“Is he alive?” the dispatcher asked.

“No, no,” the caller said.

Sharon Fulton, the wife of a pastor at the Union Hill Church, said there was shock within the small community of Peebles, which had a population of 1,782 at the time of the 2010 census.

“When one hurts, we all hurt,” she said.

ABC News’ Alex Perez contributed to this report.

Get real-time updates as this story unfolds. To start, just “star” this story in ABC News’ phone app. Download ABC News for iPhone here or ABC News for Android here.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

A ton of cocaine and seven tons of marijuana were seized from a cross-border tunnel that stretched from a Tijuana, Mexico, home to a San Diego, California, suburb, U.S. authorities said Wednesday.

“We believe this to be the longest tunnel that we have discovered in this district to date,” said Laura Duffy, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of California.

Authorities arrested six people and seized more than 2,000 pounds of cocaine and more than 14,000 pounds of marijuana. The cocaine is valued at around $22 million.

“We believe this to be the largest single seizure of cocaine related to a tunnel in the California-Mexico border,” Duffy said.

At about 3-feet wide, the tunnel measured the length of more than eight football fields (nearly a half-mile) and was equipped with lights, ventilation, a rail system and a motorized freight elevator capable of carrying up to 10 people, according to federal officials.

The six arrested in San Diego were charged with various drug trafficking and tunnel-related charges, including conspiracy to import and distribute cocaine and conspiracy to use a border tunnel.

Authorities said there have been more than a dozen secret passages found along California’s border with Mexico since 2006.

In the past five years, federal authorities have detected more than 75 cross-border smuggling tunnels, most of them in California and Arizona.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

One of the escapees is accused of torturing and mutilating the owner of a marijuana dispensary. Another was awaiting trial for a gang-related murder. The third was charged with shooting into a house full of people.

Now the three, who made a daring escape from the Orange County Men’s Jail on Friday, are the subject of a massive manhunt across Southern California involving hundreds of police officers and the FBI.

“Based on the charges that are being faced by each of the individuals that were in our custody that we’re searching for, each of the escapees should be considered dangerous,” Lt. Jeff Hallock of the Orange County Sheriff’s Department said after Friday’s dramatic breakout. “So based on the information, the evidence that has been collected so far, this was clearly a well thought out and planned escape. It’s unknown but it could have taken them weeks or even months to prepare.”

It was the first successful breakout from the jail in downtown Santa Ana in nearly 30 years.

A $50,000 reward has been offered for information leading to the recapture of the three escapees — Hossein Nayeri, 37, Jonathan Tieu, 20, and Bac Duong, 43.

Nayeri is the most notorious of the three. He was being held of two counts of kidnapping, extortion, aggravated mayhem, torture and other charges stemming from a stomach-churning episode that could have been an episode from “Breaking Bad.”

Prosecutors said Nayeri and two other men used a blowtorch to torture a licensed pot dealer in the mistaken belief he had money buried in the desert. They then sliced off his penis and poured bleach on him before dumping him and his girlfriend by the side of a road.

Nayeri tried to flee to Iran but was caught by the FBI in Prague. He had been held at the jail since September 2014.

Tieu is an accused gang member who had been in the jail since October 2013 and charged with murder, attempted murder and street terrorism, officials said.

Duong had been at the jail for little over a month and was charged with attempted murder, burglary, three firearms violations and other charges.

The three escapees were being held in a large dormitory-style cell with 65 other prisoners when they cut through the steel grate behind their bunk beads some time after the Friday morning head count and slithered through a plumbing tunnel to reach the roof, Hallock said.

This entry passed through the Full-Text RSS service – if this is your content and you’re reading it on someone else’s site, please read the FAQ at fivefilters.org/content-only/faq.php#publishers.

Read More

Powered by WPeMatico

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More