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Ali had been at HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center in Scottsdale since Thursday with what spokesman Bob Gunnell had described as a respiratory issue.
“After a 32-year battle with Parkinson’s disease, Muhammad Ali has passed away at the age of 74. The three-time World Heavyweight Champion boxer died this evening,” Gunnell said in a statement. “The Ali family would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers, and support and asks for privacy at this time.”
Ali’s daughter Hana Ali said her father was a “humble mountain.”
“And now he has gone home to God. God bless you daddy. YOU ARE THE LOVE OF MY LIFE!” she tweeted.
Longtime Ali friend John Ramsey, who works for WAVE in Louisville, Kentucky — Ali’s hometown — and who has a radio show on ESPN, was at the hospital with Ali’s family when the boxing legend died.
“When he came into the hospital, we thought, ‘OK, it will be a brief stay’… I think it took a turn for the worse,” he told CNN’s Dan Simon Saturday. “But it was unexpected.”
Ramsey said he didn’t actually see Ali in the hospital Friday. The people who were with Ali when he died were “the kids, family only, and I respected that… it’s a very private matter.”
Ramsey said Ali’s wife, Lonnie, called him Friday morning saying Ali’s health was deteriorating.
“She said ‘You might want to come out,’ which I decided to do,” he said.

Tributes from around the world

While touching tributes to Ali were pouring in from world leaders, fellow athletes and just regular folk, the boxing great had already addressed how he wanted the world to think about him after his death.
In his book “The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life’s Journey,” Ali said he wanted to be remembered as “a man who won the heavyweight title three times, who was humorous, and who treated everyone right. As a man who never looked down on those who looked up to him, and who helped as many people as he could. As a man who stood up for his beliefs no matter what. As a man who tried to unite all humankind through faith and love.”
He added, ” And if all that’s too much, then I guess I’d settle for being remembered only as a great boxer who became a leader and a champion of his people, And I wouldn’t even mind if folks forgot how pretty I was.”
President Barack Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama mourn Ali’s passing.
“But we’re also grateful to God for how fortunate we are to have known him, if just for a while; for how fortunate we all are that The Greatest chose to grace our time,” the Obamas said in a statement Saturday.
The President said he has a pair of Ali’s gloves on display in his private study off of the Oval Office, just underneath a photograph of the legend.
Obama said Ali “fought for us.”
“He stood with King and Mandela; stood up when it was hard; spoke out when others wouldn’t. His fight outside the ring would cost him his title and his public standing. It would earn him enemies on the left and the right, make him reviled, and nearly send him to jail. But Ali stood his ground. And his victory helped us get used to the America we recognize today,” the President said in a statement issued by the White House.
Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, at a ceremony honoring Ali Saturday, said the boxer “lived a life so big and bold, it’s hard to believe that any one man could do everything he did, could be all the things that he became in the course of just one lifetime.”
He added, “Muhammad Ali belongs to the world, but he only has one hometown. The ‘Louisville Lip’ spoke to everyone, but we heard him in a way no one else could — as our brother, our uncle, and our inspiration.”
Don King, the boxing promoter who was every bit as brash as Ali, told CNN that in his mind Ali will never die.
“His spirit will go on forever,” he said. “He’s just a great human being, a champion of the people, the greatest of all time.”
Even as the former champ battled Parkinson’s, he had the same love for life and people, King said. Parkinson’s disease, which primarily affects a patient’s movement, is a “progressive disorder of the nervous system,” according to the Mayo Clinic.
The Ali sense of humor was displayed in an old photo tweeted by Oscar De La Hoya, who won titles in six weight classes.
“RIP @muhammadali, a legend who transcended sport and was a true champion for all. #thegreatest #MuhammadAli,” De La Hoya wrote above an image of Ali whose mischievous eyes proudly watched as his right hand made rabbit ears behind the “Golden Boy’s” head.
Hours before her famed father passed away, Laila Ali posted a throwback photo of him with her daughter, Sydney, who was born in 2011.
“I love this photo of my father and my daughter Sydney when she was a baby! Thanks for all the love and well wishes. I feel your love and appreciate it!!” Laila Ali, herself a former world champion boxer, wrote.
George Foreman, who Ali defeated in 1974 for the world heavyweight title, wrote on Twitter, “It’s been said it was rope a dope Ali beat me with. (N)o (it was) his beauty that beat me. Most beauty I’ve know(n). loved him.”
Famed promoter Bob Arum wrote on Twitter: “A true great has left us. @MuhammadAli transformed this country and impacted the world with his spirit.”
Mike Tyson, the youngest heavyweight champion in history, said, “God came for his champion. So long great one. @MuhammadAli #TheGreatest #RIP.”
In recent years, Ali had largely stayed out of the public spotlight. In his last known appearance, he appeared at a Parkinson’s fundraiser April 9 in Phoenix, according to the Arizona Republic. A photo posted by the newspaper showed Ali wearing dark sunglasses.
On the website of the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the actor — who also has Parkinson’s — said: “Muhammad was a true legend — a champion in the boxing ring, and a champion for millions of Parkinson’s families. We looked up to him as an example of grace and courage in the face of great challenges.”
Ali was known not only for his athletic prowess but also for his social activism.
He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, as Cassius Clay in January 1942. He began boxing as an amateur when he was 12 years old and in 1964 became heavyweight champion with a knockout of Sonny Liston. That year he joined the Nation of Islam and changed his name.
Ali’s sparkling career was interrupted for 3½ years in the 1960s when he refused induction into the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War and was convicted of draft evasion. The Supreme Court overturned the conviction.
Ali was prepared to go to prison, King said.
“He stood his ground on who he was,” King said. “He’d rather go to jail than break what he believed in.”
During his boxing hiatus, Ali spoke out about racism in America.
NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar called Ali a friend and a mentor.
“At a time when blacks who spoke up about injustice were labeled uppity and often arrested under one pretext or another, Muhammad willingly sacrificed the best years of his career to stand tall and fight for what he believed was right,” Abdul-Jabbar wrote on Facebook.
Ali went on to win the heavyweight title twice more before retiring for good in 1981.
Ali also was hospitalized in January 2015 with a urinary tract infection. He was hospitalized in December 2014 with pneumonia.
Funeral services will be held in Louisville, Gunnell said.

CNN’s Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

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Ali had been at HonorHealth Scottsdale Osborn Medical Center in Scottsdale since Thursday with what spokesman Bob Gunnell had described as a respiratory issue.
“After a 32-year battle with Parkinson’s disease, Muhammad Ali has passed away at the age of 74. The three-time World Heavyweight Champion boxer died this evening,” Gunnell said in a statement. “The Ali family would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers, and support and asks for privacy at this time.”
Ali’s daughter Hana Ali said her father was a “humble mountain.”
“And now he has gone home to God. God bless you daddy. YOU ARE THE LOVE OF MY LIFE!” she tweeted.
Longtime Ali friend John Ramsey, who works for WAVE in Louisville, Kentucky — Ali’s hometown — and who has a radio show on ESPN, was at the hospital with Ali’s family when the boxing legend died.
“When he came into the hospital, we thought, ‘OK, it will be a brief stay’… I think it took a turn for the worse,” he told CNN’s Dan Simon Saturday. “But it was unexpected.”
Ramsey said he didn’t actually see Ali in the hospital Friday. The people who were with Ali when he died were “the kids, family only, and I respected that… it’s a very private matter.”
Ramsey said Ali’s wife, Lonnie, called him Friday morning saying Ali’s health was deteriorating.
“She said ‘You might want to come out,’ which I decided to do,” he said.

Tributes from around the world

While touching tributes to Ali were pouring in from world leaders, fellow athletes and just regular folk, the boxing great had already addressed how he wanted the world to think about him after his death.
In his book “The Soul of a Butterfly: Reflections on Life’s Journey,” Ali said he wanted to be remembered as “a man who won the heavyweight title three times, who was humorous, and who treated everyone right. As a man who never looked down on those who looked up to him, and who helped as many people as he could. As a man who stood up for his beliefs no matter what. As a man who tried to unite all humankind through faith and love.”
He added, ” And if all that’s too much, then I guess I’d settle for being remembered only as a great boxer who became a leader and a champion of his people, And I wouldn’t even mind if folks forgot how pretty I was.”
President Barack Obama said he and first lady Michelle Obama mourn Ali’s passing.
“But we’re also grateful to God for how fortunate we are to have known him, if just for a while; for how fortunate we all are that The Greatest chose to grace our time,” the Obamas said in a statement Saturday.
The President said he has a pair of Ali’s gloves on display in his private study off of the Oval Office, just underneath a photograph of the legend.
Obama said Ali “fought for us.”
“He stood with King and Mandela; stood up when it was hard; spoke out when others wouldn’t. His fight outside the ring would cost him his title and his public standing. It would earn him enemies on the left and the right, make him reviled, and nearly send him to jail. But Ali stood his ground. And his victory helped us get used to the America we recognize today,” the President said in a statement issued by the White House.
Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, at a ceremony honoring Ali Saturday, said the boxer “lived a life so big and bold, it’s hard to believe that any one man could do everything he did, could be all the things that he became in the course of just one lifetime.”
He added, “Muhammad Ali belongs to the world, but he only has one hometown. The ‘Louisville Lip’ spoke to everyone, but we heard him in a way no one else could — as our brother, our uncle, and our inspiration.”
Don King, the boxing promoter who was every bit as brash as Ali, told CNN that in his mind Ali will never die.
“His spirit will go on forever,” he said. “He’s just a great human being, a champion of the people, the greatest of all time.”
Even as the former champ battled Parkinson’s, he had the same love for life and people, King said. Parkinson’s disease, which primarily affects a patient’s movement, is a “progressive disorder of the nervous system,” according to the Mayo Clinic.
The Ali sense of humor was displayed in an old photo tweeted by Oscar De La Hoya, who won titles in six weight classes.
“RIP @muhammadali, a legend who transcended sport and was a true champion for all. #thegreatest #MuhammadAli,” De La Hoya wrote above an image of Ali whose mischievous eyes proudly watched as his right hand made rabbit ears behind the “Golden Boy’s” head.
Hours before her famed father passed away, Laila Ali posted a throwback photo of him with her daughter, Sydney, who was born in 2011.
“I love this photo of my father and my daughter Sydney when she was a baby! Thanks for all the love and well wishes. I feel your love and appreciate it!!” Laila Ali, herself a former world champion boxer, wrote.
George Foreman, who Ali defeated in 1974 for the world heavyweight title, wrote on Twitter, “It’s been said it was rope a dope Ali beat me with. (N)o (it was) his beauty that beat me. Most beauty I’ve know(n). loved him.”
Famed promoter Bob Arum wrote on Twitter: “A true great has left us. @MuhammadAli transformed this country and impacted the world with his spirit.”
Mike Tyson, the youngest heavyweight champion in history, said, “God came for his champion. So long great one. @MuhammadAli #TheGreatest #RIP.”
In recent years, Ali had largely stayed out of the public spotlight. In his last known appearance, he appeared at a Parkinson’s fundraiser April 9 in Phoenix, according to the Arizona Republic. A photo posted by the newspaper showed Ali wearing dark sunglasses.
On the website of the Michael J. Fox Foundation, the actor — who also has Parkinson’s — said: “Muhammad was a true legend — a champion in the boxing ring, and a champion for millions of Parkinson’s families. We looked up to him as an example of grace and courage in the face of great challenges.”
Ali was known not only for his athletic prowess but also for his social activism.
He was born in Louisville, Kentucky, as Cassius Clay in January 1942. He began boxing as an amateur when he was 12 years old and in 1964 became heavyweight champion with a knockout of Sonny Liston. That year he joined the Nation of Islam and changed his name.
Ali’s sparkling career was interrupted for 3½ years in the 1960s when he refused induction into the U.S. Army during the Vietnam War and was convicted of draft evasion. The Supreme Court overturned the conviction.
Ali was prepared to go to prison, King said.
“He stood his ground on who he was,” King said. “He’d rather go to jail than break what he believed in.”
During his boxing hiatus, Ali spoke out about racism in America.
NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar called Ali a friend and a mentor.
“At a time when blacks who spoke up about injustice were labeled uppity and often arrested under one pretext or another, Muhammad willingly sacrificed the best years of his career to stand tall and fight for what he believed was right,” Abdul-Jabbar wrote on Facebook.
Ali went on to win the heavyweight title twice more before retiring for good in 1981.
Ali also was hospitalized in January 2015 with a urinary tract infection. He was hospitalized in December 2014 with pneumonia.
Funeral services will be held in Louisville, Gunnell said.

CNN’s Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

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Donald Trump’s doctor released a medical report so silly that when we asked the American Medical Association about its language, their spokesman started to laugh.
Donald Trump’s doctor appears to be just as bombastic as he is.
It’s the only conclusion to be drawn from a hilariously bizarre letter that the mogul’s doctor—Harold Bornstein—wrote about his yuuuugely terrific health. And the letter raises as many questions as it answers.
Bornstein, a Manhattan gastroenterologist who shared a medical practice with his father, writes he has been Trump’s doctor since 1980. His father, Jacob Bornstein, died in 2010 at the age of 93. But that didn’t stop Trump from Twitter-thanking Bornstein the elder for writing up his letter.
“I am proud to share this health report, written by the highly respected Dr. Jacob Bornstein of Lenox Hill Hospital,” the mogul tweeted, linking to the letter.
Trump later deleted the tweet, probably because Jacob Bornstein is dead. Harold Bornstein, however, is very much alive and says Donald Trump is the picture of health. In the letter, he describes his health over the past few decades using language that veers from standard to bizarre.
For example, he describes Trump’s recent physical exam as “show[ing] only positive results.”
While it’s clear he means to say everything was normal, the word “positive” is an odd use of the term in medicine. Rather, it typically means that some result or finding was present—and those findings aren’t always great news (think testing positive for a disease). The wording is clearly chosen more for rhetorical effect than clear medical communication—and that choice left some experts scratching their heads.
“It’s very odd for a doctor to say, ‘He’s had a complete medical examination that showed only positive results,’” said Jonathan Moreno, a professor of medical ethics at the University of Pennsylvania. “Normally a positive result in the language of medicine is not a good thing. Nonetheless, I will not accuse Dr. Bornstein of not writing his own letter.”
Bornstein also describes Trump’s “laboratory test results” as “astonishingly excellent” (without noting which tests were run). That is a weird thing to say, as not many …Read More

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Bulletproof glass and armed security are nothing new at medical clinics that provide abortions. But in the wake of a deadly shooting last week at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado, clinics nationwide are redoubling security efforts, checking surveillance cameras and reviewing evacuation plans.
Police say they’re adding patrols to clinics to guard against those who might be inspired to mimic a shootout that killed three people and injured nine.
For the folks who work in the nation’s 400-some clinics that provide abortions, it’s a time of resolve and reflection about the dangers they face.
“It is an unusual time,” said Vicki Cowart, CEO for Planned Parenthood in the Rocky Mountain Region. “There a vitriol, there’s a hate speech in our country going on right now that could be causing more violence than we might otherwise see.”

We are open, and we are going to be here for our patients.
Vicki Cowart, CEO for Planned Parenthood in the Rocky Mountain Region

“Nonetheless, we are good at our security,” she said. “We are open, and we are going to be here for our patients.”
But the clinic in Colorado Springs remains closed, heavily damaged during an hourslong standoff last Friday. Police say Robert Lewis Dear, 57, terrorized dozens when he opened fire at the clinic, which had 45 people inside but no security guard.
A receptionist heard gunshots just before noon, Cowart said, and alerted the staff to lock their doors and silence their phones, the recommended procedure when confronting an active shooter. Staffers and patients waited for hours, locked in exam rooms and closets, their phones draining of power while they awaited an all-clear from police.
Hundreds more people in a nearby strip mall and grocery store were locked down, too, as police exchanged fire with the gunman and tried to pinpoint his location.
The shootout left three dead, including a police officer and a man who reportedly accompanied his pregnant friend to an ultrasound appointment.
Hours after the shootout ended, Planned Parenthood staffers were vowing to return to work as usual Monday morning. But little has been normal since the attack, just the latest incident thought to target clinics that provide abortions.
The FBI sent a bulletin in September warning such clinics that “it is likely criminal or suspicious incidents will continue to be …Read More

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Bulletproof glass and armed security are nothing new at medical clinics that provide abortions. But in the wake of a deadly shooting last week at a Planned Parenthood clinic in Colorado, clinics nationwide are redoubling security efforts, checking surveillance cameras and reviewing evacuation plans.
Police say they’re adding patrols to clinics to guard against those who might be inspired to mimic a shootout that killed three people and injured nine.
For the folks who work in the nation’s 400-some clinics that provide abortions, it’s a time of resolve and reflection about the dangers they face.
“It is an unusual time,” said Vicki Cowart, CEO for Planned Parenthood in the Rocky Mountain Region. “There a vitriol, there’s a hate speech in our country going on right now that could be causing more violence than we might otherwise see.”

We are open, and we are going to be here for our patients.
Vicki Cowart, CEO for Planned Parenthood in the Rocky Mountain Region

“Nonetheless, we are good at our security,” she said. “We are open, and we are going to be here for our patients.”
But the clinic in Colorado Springs remains closed, heavily damaged during an hourslong standoff last Friday. Police say Robert Lewis Dear, 57, terrorized dozens when he opened fire at the clinic, which had 45 people inside but no security guard.
A receptionist heard gunshots just before noon, Cowart said, and alerted the staff to lock their doors and silence their phones, the recommended procedure when confronting an active shooter. Staffers and patients waited for hours, locked in exam rooms and closets, their phones draining of power while they awaited an all-clear from police.
Hundreds more people in a nearby strip mall and grocery store were locked down, too, as police exchanged fire with the gunman and tried to pinpoint his location.
The shootout left three dead, including a police officer and a man who reportedly accompanied his pregnant friend to an ultrasound appointment.
Hours after the shootout ended, Planned Parenthood staffers were vowing to return to work as usual Monday morning. But little has been normal since the attack, just the latest incident thought to target clinics that provide abortions.
The FBI sent a bulletin in September warning such clinics that “it is likely criminal or suspicious incidents will continue to be …Read More

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Medical aid group Medicins Sans Frontieres (MSF) said on Thursday it was hard to believe a U.S. strike on an Afghan hospital last month was a mistake, as it had reports of fleeing people being shot from an aircraft.At least 30 people were killed when the hospital in Kunduz was hit by the strike on Oct. 3 while Afghan government forces were battling to regain control of the northern city from Taliban forces who had seized it days earlier.The United States has said the hospital was hit by accident and two separate investigations by the U.S. and NATO are underway but the circumstances of the incident, one of the worst of its kind during the 14-year conflict, are still unclear.MSF General Director Christopher Stokes told reporters the organization was still awaiting an explanation from the U.S. military.”All the information that we’ve provided so far shows that a mistake is quite hard to understand and believe at this stage,” he said while presenting an MSF internal report on the incident. The report said many staff described “seeing people being shot, most likely from the plane” as they tried to flee the main hospital building.”From what we are seeing now, this action is illegal in the laws of war,” Stokes said. “There are still many unanswered questions, including who took the final decision, who gave the targeting instructions for the hospital.”

Several Afghan officials have suggested Taliban fighters were using the hospital as a base, a claim that MSF firmly rejects. It says the facility was under its control at all times and there were no armed fighters present either before or during the attack. The hospital was treating wounded combatants from both sides as well as civilians, but the group says it always maintained a strict policy of neutrality between the two sides.”Treating wounded combatants is not a crime,” Stokes said.

MSF says the site’s location had been clearly communicated to both Afghan forces and the Taliban and it was clearly identifiable as a hospital.”That night, it was one of the few buildings with electrical power, it was fully lit up,” Stokes said.He also said that inspections of the area around the hospital since the Taliban withdrew from Kunduz last month did not reveal signs of heavy fighting.

MSF, called Doctors Without Borders in English, has revised the original casualty figure upwards …Read More

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Medical aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) on Sunday demanded an independent international inquiry into a suspected U.S. air strike that killed 22 people in an Afghan hospital it runs, branding the attack a “war crime”.U.S. Defense Secretary Ash Carter promised a full investigation into whether the American military was connected to the destruction of the hospital, but cautioned it would take time to gather information.”We do know that American air assets … were engaged in the Kunduz vicinity, and we do know that the structures that – you see in the news – were destroyed,” Carter told reporters traveling with him shortly before landing in Spain on Sunday. “I just can’t tell you what the connection is at this time.”The Pentagon chief would not speculate on what occurred but said Washington would hold accountable “anybody responsible for doing something they shouldn’t have done.”MSF said a U.S. military probe into the incident, which occurred during a push by Afghan security forces to retake the key northern city of Kunduz from Taliban insurgents, was not enough.”Relying only on an internal investigation by a party to the conflict would be wholly insufficient,” MSF General Director Christopher Stokes said in a statement.”Under the clear presumption that a war crime has been committed, MSF demands that a full and transparent investigation into the event be conducted by an independent international body,” Stokes said.Battles were still raging on Sunday around Kunduz, a city of 300,000, as government forces backed by U.S. air power sought to drive out the Taliban militants who seized the city almost a week ago in one of their biggest victories in the 14-year war.Decomposing bodies littered the streets and trapped residents said food was becoming scarce.

“This city is no longer fit for living,” said the province’s public health director, Sayed Mukhtar. Any confirmation of U.S. responsibility for the hospital deaths would deal a blow to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s policy of forging closer ties with the United States. His predecessor, Hamid Karzai, fell out with his backers in Washington in part over the number of civilians killed by U.S. strikes. But the Afghan leader will be torn between distancing himself from Washington and the need for American firepower to help his forces drive insurgents out of Kunduz.The U.S. military said it conducted an air strike “in the …Read More

Medical aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) on Sunday demanded an independent international inquiry into a suspected U.S. air strike that killed 22 people in an Afghan hospital it runs, branding the attack a “war crime”. MSF said a U.S. military probe into the incident, which occurred during a push by Afghan security forces to retake the key northern city of Kunduz from Taliban insurgents, was not enough.”Relying only on an internal investigation by a party to the conflict would be wholly insufficient,” MSF General Director Christopher Stokes said in a statement.”Under the clear presumption that a war crime has been committed, MSF demands that a full and transparent investigation into the event be conducted by an independent international body,” Stokes said.Battles were still raging on Sunday around Kunduz, a city of 300,000, as government forces backed by U.S. air power sought to drive out the Taliban militants who seized the city almost a week ago in one of their biggest victories in the 14-year war.Decomposing bodies littered the streets and trapped residents said that food was running scarce.

Any confirmation of U.S. responsibility for the hospital deaths would deal a blow to Afghan President Ashraf Ghani’s policy of forging closer ties with the United States. His predecessor Hamid Karzai fell out with his backers in Washington in part over the number of civilians killed by U.S. strikes. But the Afghan leader will be torn between distancing himself from Washington and the need for American firepower to help his forces drive insurgents out of Kunduz.The U.S. military said it conducted an air strike “in the vicinity” of the MSF hospital as it targeted Taliban insurgents who were directly firing on U.S. military personnel. It has not acknowledged hitting the hospital.

President Barack Obama offered condolences to the victims of what he called “the tragic incident”. The U.N. human rights chief said the hospital assault was “inexcusable” and also said it could amount to a war crime.The U.S.-led coalition force in Afghanistan said it expected to complete its preliminary multi-national investigation within days.In Kabul, the Ministry of Defence said Taliban fighters had attacked the hospital and were using the building “as a human shield”. But MSF denied this.

“Not a single member of our staff reported any fighting inside the MSF hospital compound prior to the …Read More

Medical aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres denied that Taliban fighters were firing from its hospital at Afghan and NATO forces before a suspected U.S. air strike killed at least 19 people in a battle to oust the Islamist insurgents from an Afghan city.The northern city of Kunduz has been the scene of fierce fighting since the Taliban captured it almost a week ago. Afghan security forces fought their way into Kunduz four days ago, but battles continue in many places.The aid group has said an air strike, probably carried out by U.S.-led coalition forces, killed 19 staff and patients on Saturday in a hospital it runs in Kunduz, leaving 37 wounded.

The U.S. military said it conducted an air strike “in the vicinity” of the hospital, as it targeted Taliban insurgents who were directly firing on U.S. military personnel.The U.S. government promised a full investigation into the incident as the U.N. human rights chief said the bombing could amount to a war crime.

In a statement, President Barack Obama offered condolences to the victims of what he called “the tragic incident”. In Kabul, the Afghan Ministry of Defense said Taliban fighters had attacked the hospital and were using the building “as a human shield”. But the medical aid group denied this.

“The gates of the hospital compound were closed all night so no one that is not staff, a patient or a caretaker was inside the hospital when the bombing happened,” Medecins Sans Frontieres said in a statement on Sunday. Witnesses said patients were burned alive in the crowded hospital after the airstrike in the early hours of Saturday. Among the dead were three children being treated.Frantic MSF staff telephoned military officials at NATO in Kabul and Washington after the attack, but bombs continued to rain down for nearly an hour, one official of the group said.Taliban fighters in Kunduz were still holding out against Afghan troops on Sunday, despite government claims to have taken control of the area.”Our understanding is that the whole area is still contested,” said a coalition military official in Kabul, who asked not to be named.Corpses lie in the streets and people are too afraid to leave their homes, said one resident, Gulboddin. “You can hear the sound of gun fire all over the city,” said Gulboddin, who has only one name. “Some …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More