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U.S. stocks sold off further on Thursday, giving the Dow and S&P 500 their worst four-day starts to a year ever, dragged down by another drop in Chinese equities and oil prices at 12-year lows.China allowed the biggest fall in its yuan currency CNY=CFXS CNY= in five months, adding to investor fears about the health of its economy, while Shanghai stocks .SSEC were halted for the second time this week after another steep selloff. Oil prices CLc1 LCOc1 fell to 12-year lows and copper prices CMCU3 touched their lowest since 2009, weighing on energy and materials shares. Shares of Freeport McMoran (FCX.N) dropped 9.1 percent to $5.61. All 10 S&P 500 sectors ended in the red, though, and the Nasdaq Biotech index .NBI fell 4.1 percent.”People see the weakness in China and in the overall equity market and think there’s going to be an impact on corporations here in the United States,” said Robert Pavlik, chief market strategist at Boston Private Wealth in New York.”When you have a market that begins a year with weakness, people are sort of suspect anyway. The economy isn’t moving all that well, the outlook is modest at best, and they don’t want to wait for the long term. China creates more uncertainty.”The Dow Jones industrial average .DJI closed down 392.41 points, or 2.32 percent, to 16,514.1, the S&P 500 .SPX had lost 47.17 points, or 2.37 percent, to 1,943.09 and the Nasdaq Composite .IXIC had dropped 146.34 points, or 3.03 percent, to 4,689.43.

The Dow has lost 5.2 percent since the end of 2015 in the worst first four trading days since the 30-stock index was created in 1928. The S&P 500 is down 4.9 percent since Dec. 31, its worst four-day opening in its history, according to S&P Dow Jones Indices, while the Nasdaq is down 6.4 percent.Stocks extended declines late in the session, and the CBOE Volatility Index .VIX, the market’s favored gauge of Wall Street anxiety, ended up 21.4 percent at 24.99, its highest since Sept. 29.Investors also braced for Friday’s U.S. government jobs report, which could show how well-insulated the U.S. economy is from international stresses.

Billionaire investor George Soros, speaking at an economic forum in Sri Lanka, drew similarities between the present environment and the financial crash of 2008. He said global markets were facing a crisis and investors needed to be very cautious, Bloomberg reported.Apple (AAPL.O), which generates a lot of its business …Read More

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LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More

LANSING, MI — Medical marijuana sold through licensed dispensaries would be tracked from “seed to sale” under new legislation in the Michigan House.
House Bill 4827, sponsored by Judiciary Committee Chairman Klint Kesto, R-Commerce Township, would require the state to establish or contract for a marijuana tracking system.
The legislation would complement an ongoing push to formally allow and regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, some of which have continued to operate in a legal grey area since a 2013 Michigan Supreme Court ruling.
The dispensary bill would see the state license larger-scale marijuana growers, processors, transporters, “provisioning centers” and product safety testing facilities.
Marijuana transfers to dispensaries would be subject to an 8 percent tax under the proposed system, which would run parallel to the voter-approved caregiver home growing model.
The tracking bill is the latest wrinkle in the evolving medical marijuana dispensary plan, which may also provide a regulatory framework in the event that a recreational legalization proposal makes the ballot in 2016.
“We believe that regulation is the way forward,” said Jessica Billingsley, chief operating officer and co-founder of MJ Freeway Business Solutions, a tracking software company that could eventually bid for the state contract.
“Cannabis is unique in that it’s brought to market in a high-value dried flower form that loses value and weight as it evaporates, and it requires very unique inventory tracking in order to maintain a clear chain of custody and to prevent diversion.”
MJ Freeway, based in Colorado, is among a growing number of companies now offering marijuana inventory tracking software in states that have legalized marijuana for medical or recreational use.
Kesto invited MJ Freeway to testify before the committee on Tuesday but noted that his invitation did not reflect an endorsement of their particular suite of tracking and compliance software.
Tracking medical marijuana can improve patient and product safety, according to MJ Freeway program manager Tony Reese, ensuring that strains are properly identified, testing is completed and dosage is consistent.
Tracking can also benefit public safety and help states avoid interference by the federal government, which continues to consider marijuana an illegal controlled substance, according to Reese.
“It’s product going across state borders that draws federal interference,” he said, explaining that tracking systems can help match supply and demand.
“It’s when supply overreaches demand significantly that things like diversion — people taking product and trying to capitalize that product in other markets to recover the capital …Read More